The importance of Fiber  

Many people suffer from symptoms of digestive discomfort such as feelings of occasional irregularity from time to time.

Symptoms can often become worse when we are irregular and have a slow digestive transit time, which is where eating enough fiber, especially wheat bran fiber may help.

Fiber is an essential nutrient that our bodies need to help run smoothly. Unlike others, it’s not digested, but acts as an agent to help make sure everything else is. So although it passes through the gut relatively unchanged, it’s an important ingredient that helps get rid of what we don’t need.
Fiber is only found in plant foods. One of the main types is cereal grain, where it’s found in the outer casing, or husk of the grain. The tough, fibrous parts of fruit and vegetables (particularly in the stalk and skins) are also great sources, whereas animal foods, such as meat, fish, milk and cheese contain very little.

Wheat bran is a rich source of natural fiber and the entire All-Bran product family is packed with it.

Reference: Cummings JH. (2001) The effect of dietary fiber on fecal weight and composition. Chapter 4.4 in: CRC Handbook of Dietary Fiber ain Human Nutrition. 3rd edition. Edit GA Spiller. CRC Press, Boca Raton.

Nothing – it’s just a different spelling. In the U.S. we tend to talk about ‘fiber’ and in the UK and Europe they spell it ‘fibre’. It’s exactly the same substance doing the same great job for our bodies.
Much of the food that we eat is digested in the stomach and small intestine, but fiber isn’t, so passes relatively unchanged into the large intestine (sometimes called the colon). Insoluble fibers act like blotting paper, soaking up water to form a soft bulky mass, which is easier to move along the digestive tract.
Yes. Fiber can be broadly split into two types – soluble and insoluble (wheat bran is the insoluble type). Both types are important in a healthy balanced diet.

Insoluble fiber - This type of fiber can't be digested like other nutrients but is really important for the digestive tract, helping to ‘bulk up’ waste product as it moves. It’s often referred to as 'roughage' or 'bulk' because of the way it increases volume and helps reduce digestive transit time. This ‘snowball effect’ helps to keep you regular.

Good sources include: wheat bran, whole-wheat flour, certain vegetables and nuts and, of course, the entire All-Bran product family.

Soluble fiber - Soluble fiber forms a gel-like material in water. It’s known for its cholesterol lowering properties as it mops it up, helping to remove it from the body. Good sources include: oats, many types of fruit, barley and beans.

Reference: EFSA (European Food Safety Authority) (2010b) Wheat bran fibre related health claims see: http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/scdocs/doc/1817.pdf

You can increase the amount of fiber in your diet by making some easy swaps:

  • Start your day with a cereal high in natural wheat bran fiber, such as Kellogg's All-Bran.
  • Go for brown rice or whole wheat pasta instead of the white varieties – or try a 50:50 mix.
  • Opt for a handful of nuts or fruit instead of chips, snack bars or cookies.
  • Switch from white bread to whole grain, seeded or another high-fiber variety.
  • Make sure you’re eating at least five servings of fruit and vegetables every day.
  • Add peas, beans or lentils to stews and casseroles.
  • Add extra vegetables when making meat sauce for lasagne, curries, chilli etc., or why not go veggie and make a meat-free version for a change?
  • Choose whole grain, oat or rye crackers instead of your usual variety.

McCance and Widdowson's The Composition of Foods (Sixth Edition). Royal Society of Chemistry, Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food plus manufacturer website.

The easiest way is to check food labels. If a food claims to be high in fiber, it has to contain at least 5g per labeled serving. If it’s a ‘good source of fiber’, it has to have at least 3g of fiber per labeled serving.

Fruit and vegetables don’t usually carry nutrition panels, but you know that by eating at least five servings a day, you’re giving your body the fiber boost it needs.

For fiber to work effectively, it needs to absorb water. That’s because fluids help to form the soft, bulky mass that is passed through the body and turned into waste. Not enough water can lead to occasional irregularity and an uncomfortable, bloated feeling so make sure to drink at least 8 glasses a day – more if you lead an active lifestyle or work in an air-conditioned office.

All fibers are important and have different effects on the body but wheat bran is one of the most concentrated types. That means it contains more fiber than many other grains, oats and rice. It is a great fiber for digestive health.

Research shows that 10g natural wheat bran each day has the effect of bulking stools, helping to keep things moving through the digestive system.

Reference: Spiller, Gene A. CRC Handbook of Dietary Fiber in Human Nutrition, 3rd edition CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL 2001

The Kellogg's All-Bran product line provides between 3.9g and 10.8g fiber per serving, which is up to 43% of your recommended fiber intake (the Guideline Daily Amount of fiber is 25g per day). In addition to the benefits of natural wheat bran fiber, Kellogg's All-Bran cereals provide an important source of six B-vitamins, iron and vitamin D.
Nine out of ten people in the U.S. don't get enough fiber. As a guide, you should aim for 25g each day, from foods such as cereal (like wheat bran and oat bran), legumes (lentils, beans and peas), nuts, grains, fruit and vegetables. The truth is, most of us need to increase our fiber intake by about 50% in order to reach our target.

Natural wheat bran fiber contributes to faster digestive transit, which helps to keep the body feeling good. 1 serving of All-Bran provides 10g of natural wheat bran fiber and helps contribute to a healthy, balanced diet.

Reference: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. “What We Eat in America,” Nutrient Intakes from Food by Gender and Age. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2009-2010. http://www.ars.usda.gov/SP2UserFiles/Place/12355000/pdf/0910/Table_1_NIN_GEN_09.pdf. Accessed December 18, 2013.

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